Photos & Quotes From Snitker’s Press Conference

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The following quotes were taken from Brian Snitker’s introductory press conference on Thursday afternoon.

How did this whole process come about? How did talks with (Atlanta Braves G.M.) Frank (Wren) and (Atlanta Braves Manager) Fredi (Gonzalez) go?
Snitker: “In these situations, you really don’t have a lot of say. Frank and Fredi called me into their office and told me this is the direction they wanted to go. From my standpoint it was a good mix for me because at the time I didn’t have to stay and could have gone somewhere else and pursued another Major League job with another organization, but after talking with them I told them that I have been here 37-38 years and I’m getting to that age were I’m not looking to start over anywhere. This situation is really good for me. I will be able to stay home. For 16 years in this business I left in February and came home in September, and my wife was left home with the kids. It was a good fit for me, I’ve known (General Manager of Gwinnett Braves) North (Johnson) for years, we go way back, there’s some great people here. The staff here are guys that I have a lot of respect for. I’ve worked with Mike Graus, our trainer, for over seven years in the minors, all the way from A-ball to AAA, so it’s just a good fit for me.”

Is the preparation any different from third base coach to manager?
Snitker: “It’s a lot different. When I first started as the third base coach, I was coming off of many years of managing, and I was trying to put a hit-and-run on and reminded myself that I couldn’t do that and I had to wait for (Former Braves and Hall of Fame Manager) Bobby Cox to do that. I just had to back off the throttle a little bit and realized I couldn’t get involved in that part of the game because that’s what (Bobby) is getting paid for. I prepared to coach third base for the last seven years, going through the video and looking at opposing teams’ players, and running the outfield defense and stuff like that. This is going to be a total team thing, which is going to fine. I will be more prepared in the whole game, more so than I had to in the past.”

Is that what you mean by opportunity at the Major League level, now at the Minor League level you get more autonomy now that you get to call your own shots?
Snitker: “You’re running the whole thing. You’re in charge and you’re responsible for a lot more than what I was previously doing.”

Will you coach third base?
Snitker: “Yeah, I enjoy that. I kind of like the stress of it. I always did the minor leagues unless I was injured, and as I’m getting older that is a possibility, but I will start off doing it.”

You’ve been in the big league twice on two different stints. Can you talk about how you can help these guys in the big picture?
Snitker: “I think a lot. I think being there with those guys for however many games and getting to experience playoff baseball, because there is nothing like it. It is such a cool experience and feeling. I remember when we won the wild card, Bobby’s last year, I told myself ‘I hope these guys remember how good this feels and how much fun this is when they get to Spring Training and get to the season and are they are tired, I hope that remember that feeling of playoff baseball. I learned more from the players than the actual game. When you watch those professional guys do it day in and day out, especially the guys that do it really good and watching them. Every day is the same, the work ethic is consistent. You know, guys like Tom Glavine, John Smoltz, Mark Teixera and Jason Heyward or Freddie Freeman and Brian McCann, you see how those guys had to prepare and what they put into it. It’s amazing. You don’t just show up and go out there and are really or make it look easy. It takes a lot mentality and physically to perform at that level and slow the game down so you can perform at that level. I think watching all those guys will do nothing but help me in this job.”

Do you have a sense of how (working at the Major League level will help you)?
Snitker: “Yeah, just from the experience. Just from experiences everything I went through the last seven years. I know where these guys are trying to go and do, whether it’s the mindset of a reliever or having to play every day and not taking days off or pitches off. At the Major League level if you screw up, you have to watch it for 24 hours on ESPN until they play another game. Like if I got someone thrown out, they highlight you and it’s for everyone to see for the next 24 hours. But my experience won’t allow for me to take pitches off or take any play for granted. The overall experience the last seven years will make me a better manager.

Are you a different manager than you were seven years ago? How are you different?
Snitker: “My experiences are going to make me be different. I’m not the same guy that I was seven years ago. I went through a lot in those last seven years. It was similar to the first time when I managed for a while in the minors and then I had to coach. I wasn’t real happy about it at the time, I didn’t like what was happening but it was more of an ego thing than anything else. In retrospect when I started managing again, it was the best thing that ever happened to me. So those layoffs and working for other people have made me different. I got to work with two of the better managers in the game of baseball, Bobby Cox and Fredi Gonzalez, who is not a whole different from Bobby. They are practically the same guy on how they handled situations or players and the adversity that people don’t see on an everyday basis. I told these guys upstairs, ‘You have no idea what a Major League manager goes through in the course of a day.’ When the game starts is when a manager can relax. It’s the time leading up to 7:05 PM when those guys make their money, because there is something all the time and watching how they handle that is going to help me handle things better than I did before. I probably won’t be as reactive as a I use to be. Again, physically I’m not sure I can do some of the things that I use to do. But in watching them run a team and how they handled themselves and their attitude will only make me better. Bobby was the same guy every day, whether we were up 12 or down 12. I’d sit there and react to the game and he asked, ‘What’s the matter?’ I’d sit there and see a guy hit a 0-2 fastball out and I’d be raising hell, and he looked at me and says, ‘What’s the matter?’ I didn’t know how he could just sit there, but he was amazing. All the balls that man would keep in the air was phenomenal. And what a great experience it was for me to be there the last four years.

Anything specific about how they helped you?
Snitker: “How they handled everyday situations, especially Bobby. That last year he had so many people at him, asking for different things, but he kept so many balls in the air and you would never know it. He is amazing, it was such an honor to be there the last four years. We sit in the radar room every night after the game and just talk and that was just priceless. I wish I had a tape recorder. Fredi is the same way. Number one, they are both good men and that’s what makes them who they are.”

What do you see role with the Atlanta Braves organization? Is it player development?
Snitker: “Absolutely. It’s always player development. It’s about these players and getting them to the Major Leagues. They are the reason we are here and have jobs. I want it to be a good experience. When we leave here in September, I want them to look back and not care about the win-loss record, but their experience with the 2014 Gwinnett Braves. Hopefully they can have a good feeling about it, I know some won’t because they had a bad year, but I don’t want it to be because I’m beating them over the head. I want them to enjoy their time here and if they do that they will probably perform well.

Snitker: “It wasn’t bad. Like I said I was young and reactive. It’s funny they (Gwinnett Braves) asked me what number I liked to wear and I always wanted to wear number 4 because that was Luke Appling’s number. And Luke was with me a lot. He played a big part in my baseball career when he was one of my best friends. He was always there and he’d keep a lid on me a little bit. He was there to bounce things off of. That first year was fun, I mean we were playing baseball. Back then you set up the machine to hit extra and you’d always want to be first one to hit.”

-JD-

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