Results tagged ‘ Atlanta Braves ’

G-Braves Hot Stove: La Stella Traded for Vizcaino

The Atlanta Braves traded one former G-Brave for another yesterday, sending infielder Tommy La Stella and an international bonus pool slot (No. 4) to the Chicago Cubs in exchange for right-hander Arodys Vizcaino and three international bonus pool slots (No. 2, No. 3, No. 4).

Time for a G-Braves-centric look at the trade:

La Stella entered 2014 with plenty of hype, having earned the Braves’ “Best Hitter for Average” and “Best Strike Zone Discipline” distinctions from Baseball America.  Though he didn’t display much power in his Triple-A debut, he was as-advertised for Gwinnett, batting .293 with a .384 on-base percentage in 47 games.  He ranked among International League leaders in lowest TPA/SO ratio (2nd, 1 SO/14.21 TPA), walks (T-8th, 25) and on-base percentage (10th) as of May 28, and Atlanta rewarded him with his first Major League call-up.

A few more of La Stella’s Gwinnett highlights:

  • He reached base safely in 21 consecutive games from April 10 to May 2, batting .325 (27-for-83) with one double and 14 RBIs.  It was the longest on-base streak by a G-Brave in 2014.
  • In 23 games at Coolray Field, he batted .346 (27-for-78) with two doubles and eight RBIs.
  • In his final game with Gwinnett on May 27 at Pawtucket, he belted his first career Triple-A home run, a two-run shot off RHP Matt Barnes.

La Stella started hot in the Majors, batting .411 with nine multi-hit games over his first 16 contests.  He leveled off, however, batting .251 with 16 doubles, one home run and 31 RBIs in 93 total games with the Braves.  By season’s end, he saw decreased playing time with the emergence of fellow former G-Brave Phil Gosselin.

In sending La Stella to the Cubs, the Braves have helped clear up their second base log-jam.  Gosselin is a good bet to be the Braves’ starting second baseman next April, but he may only be a placeholder for Jose Peraza.  The Braves’ top prospect and 2014 Minor League Player of the Year, Peraza batted .339 with a .364 on-base percentage and 60 stolen bases between two levels last season, but hasn’t yet played above Double-A.  He could follow the same path as La Stella, starting the year in a Gwinnett uniform before earning a Major League call-up during the season.  Second base sets up to be an intriguing spot for the G-Braves in 2015, as Gosselin, Peraza or Tyler Pastornicky could see time at the position.

Yesterday’s trade also brings the hard-throwing Vizcaino back to the Braves organization.  Before Tommy John surgery in 2012 and a trade to the Cubs that July, he was included with Julio Teheran and Randall Delgado as the next wave of prospect pitchers bound for Atlanta.  The Coolray Field faithful saw him briefly during the pitching-rich 2011 season, when he went 1-0 with a 1.29 ERA, no walks and eight strikeouts in 7.0 innings with Gwinnett.  Vizcaino made his Major League debut with Atlanta that same season, going 1-1 with a 4.67 ERA, nine walks and 17 strikeouts in 17 games, 17.1 innings.

Vizcaino had a comeback year in 2014, as he went 1-1 with a 3.51 ERA, 18 walks and 42 strikeouts over 41.0 innings in the Cubs’ minor league system.  His September call-up to Chicago produced a 5.40 ERA in five outings, 5.0 innings.

Arodys Vizcaino went 1-0 with a 1.29 ERA in six relief outings with Gwinnett in 2011.

Arodys Vizcaino went 1-0 with a 1.29 ERA in six relief outings with Gwinnett in 2011. (Gwinnett Braves)

Though Vizcaino logged most of his appearances at Triple-A Iowa, he was certainly acquired to compete for a bullpen spot with Atlanta this Spring.  His addition also provides competition for another flame-throwing former G-Brave, right-hander Juan Jaime.  Jaime and his upper-90′s fastball have been impressive in both Gwinnett and Atlanta, but he’ll have to improve his control and limit his walks (45 in 53.1 combined innings) to stick in the Majors.

This deal in the long run seems to be more about the international bonus pool slots and the minor league depth the Braves can build with them, but it also helps Atlanta bolster their pitching staff while clearing up the picture at second base.

-DL

G-Braves Hot Stove: Almonte, Wang and Veal

Chien-Ming Wang went 13-8 with a 4.12 ERA in 28 Triple-A starts in 2014.  (Credit Tommy Viola / Charlotte Knights)

Chien-Ming Wang went 13-8 with a 4.12 ERA in 28 Triple-A starts in 2014. (Photo by: Tommy Viola / Charlotte Knights)

Following a historic front office revamp in October, the Atlanta Braves are preparing for their most important Hot Stove season in recent franchise history.  Here at the G-Blog, we’ll periodically take a look at some of the players that President of Baseball Operations John Hart and the new regime are bringing in, specifically those that will have an impact on the 2015 roster here in Gwinnett.

Yesterday marked Atlanta’s first foray into Major/Minor League free agency this offseason, as the club announced the signing of outfielder Zoilo Almonte to a one-year Major League deal and pitchers Chien-Ming Wang and Donnie Veal to Minor League deals.  While these acquisitions aren’t the most notable the Braves will make this winter, they are proof that Hart and company are committed to building a deeper organization through the addition of established veterans.

Anyone who follows the Gwinnett Braves or the Triple-A International League closely will be familiar with all three players.  Almonte, Wang and Veal all spent significant time in the IL last season, and each played against the G-Braves on more than one occasion.

Almonte, on Atlanta’s 40-man roster, will contend for a spot on the 25-man Major League roster this Spring.  He’s the youngest of the three acquisitions at age 25, and he’s logged brief stints with the New York Yankees in each of the past two seasons. Almonte has never quite settled in at the plate in the big leagues, batting .211 with two home runs and 12 RBIs in 47 career games, but he’s done plenty at the Triple-A level to make him an intriguing prospect.  In 105 games with the Scranton/Wilkes-Barre RailRiders last year, he batted .261 with 18 doubles, 18 home runs and 69 RBIs.  His banner performance of 2014 occurred against Gwinnett at Coolray Field from July 23-24, a game that took two days to complete due to rain.  Almonte went 4-for-6 with three homers and seven RBIs in a 12-4 rout of the G-Braves, launching solo and three-run shots off Kanekoa Texeira and adding another three-run clout off Carlos Fisher.

Almonte is reportedly out of options and would have to clear waivers should the Braves ever want to send him to Gwinnett, so it’s unlikely that he’ll bring his homer show back to Coolray Field in 2015.  That’s not to say his addition won’t have an effect on the G-Braves’ roster.  IL veterans Todd Cunningham and Joey Terdoslavich, also competitors for the Atlanta bench, are now more likely to return to Gwinnett for their third and fourth seasons, respectively.  Cunningham (.287, 8 HR, 58 RBI, 19 SB) and Terdoslavich (.256, 15 HR, 61 RBI) both had productive Triple-A seasons a year ago.

In contrast to Almonte, Wang appears to be specifically signed to help the Gwinnett roster.  The Taiwanese right-hander posted back-to-back 19-win seasons with the New York Yankees in 2006 and 2007, but suffered a career-altering foot injury in 2008 and has since seen his profile transition to Triple-A workhorse.  Since the start of 2011, the 34-year-old has made twice as many starts in the International League (50) as he has in the Major Leagues (22).  Last year, Wang made an IL-best 28 starts with two organizations, going 13-8 with a 4.12 ERA with the Louisville Bats (Cincinnati Reds) and the Charlotte Knights (Chicago White Sox).  He struck out just 73 batters over 172.2 innings, but kept the ball on the ground with a 1.78 groundout/flyout ratio and only six homers allowed.

Much like Almonte, Wang had success facing the G-Braves last year.  He went 1-0 with a 2.92 ERA in two starts while with Louisville, then finished 3-0 with a 3.54 ERA in three starts with Charlotte.  He worked at least 6.0 innings in four of his five meetings with Gwinnett, including 7.1 scoreless, nine-hit frames in a win with the Bats on June 14.

If he joins Gwinnett, Wang would be the elder statesman of a starting rotation that could include returnees Cody Martin (7-8, 3.52) and Aaron Northcraft (7-10, 4.70) and Double-A standouts Jason Hursh (11-7, 3.58) and Williams Perez (7-6, 2.91).  Another season of 170-plus innings from Wang would also help keep the bullpen fresh in 2015.

Speaking of the Gwinnett bullpen, that’s where you might find the left-handed Veal come April.  Veal, a second-round pick by the Chicago Cubs back in 2005, has had a taste of the Majors with the Pittsburgh Pirates and the Chicago White Sox.  In 100 total games from 2009 through 2014, he went 3-3 with a 4.87 ERA and one save.  His best year was 2011, when he went 0-0 with a 1.38 ERA and 19 strikeouts in 24 relief outings with the White Sox.  Far more of his time has been spent at the Triple-A level, where he logged 25 games with the Indianapolis Indians from 2009-2011 and 89 games with the Charlotte Knights from 2012-2014.

After going 2-2 with a 2.70 ERA in 17 relief outings for Charlotte in 2013, Veal took a step back in 2014, going 4-5 with a 5.94 ERA in 37 appearances.  Against Gwinnett, he went 0-0 with a 9.00 ERA in three meetings.  Though his recent numbers don’t impress, the 30-year-old southpaw will get a look in Major League camp this Spring.  Should he fail to make the Atlanta roster, he’ll be an asset for a Gwinnett bullpen in flux.  Of last year’s G-Braves relief staff, right-hander Pedro Beato and left-handers Ryan Buchter and Atahualpa Severino are all Minor League free agents.  That trio combined to make 131 appearances for the club last season.

Yesterday’s moves don’t represent a “big splash” at the Major League level, but they are the Atlanta Braves’ first steps toward building better organizational depth — and a better Triple-A club — in 2015.

-DL

G-Braves Postgame Quotes: Jordan Walden

Atlanta Braves’ Jordan Walden made his second rehab appearance with the Gwinnett Braves on Sunday afternoon. The right-hander went one inning, walking one and striking out two. He hurled 19 pitches, 12 for strikes in the G-Braves 4-2 win over the Rochester Red Wings. After his start, I caught up with the Braves reliever.

JD: How did the Hamstring feel?

JW: “Hamstring felt good. I didn’t have any issues with it again, so that was a positive.”

JD: Was there any shoulder/arm issues associated with skipping your last scheduled rehab?

JW: “My arm just needed an extra day of rest. It was my first time out (on Thursday) and I just needed another day so that’s why I threw today.”

JD: You threw 19 pitches, 12 for strikes. Did you feel like you commanded the zone a little better today?

JW: “I mean, I walked the first guy. I wasn’t very happy with that. I didn’t feel like the command was there, but I battled through and got a couple strike outs.”

JD: First time out you said you had trouble from the stretch, how did you feel about it this time around?

JW: “I tested myself early by walking the leadoff batter. It wasn’t a good thing that I walked him but I tested myself from the stretch and it felt a lot better this time around. Especially from the last time I threw from the stretch (Thursday night).”

JD: What’s next?

JW: “I’m not sure. Hopefully I get to meet up with the team in Colorado, but at this point I have to wait and hear what they have to say.”

“The difference between a successful person and others is not the lack of strength, not a lack of knowledge, but rather a lack in will.” -Vince Lombardi-

-JD-

Gavin Floyd Postgame Quotes 4.13.14

On Sunday afternoon, Gavin Floyd took the mound for the Gwinnett Braves in his third rehab start of the 2014 season. The right-hander went 3.2 innings, allowing two hits, two runs-one earned with three walks and three strikeouts. Despite a rough first two innings, Floyd retired the last six batters he faced. He threw 73 pitches and 43 strikes in the 3-1 loss to Durham.

After the game I stopped by to check in on the Atlanta Brave.

How did you feel out there?

GF: “First couple innings I was just trying to make adjustments because I was rushing a little bit. I was able to make that adjustment in the third and fourth inning. I was glad I was able to make that adjustment and end the game on a good note.”

You had a rocky few first inning, what did you start doing differently in the last two frames?

GF: “My pace was quick. Everything was going too fast. I kept jumping at the plate. So I refocused and took a breather. I was able to slow myself down a little bit and make pitches.”

What were you trying to accomplish with this start? Was it a result oriented start or just another live workday?

GF: “Obviously you want results as a pitcher. In an ideal world, I wish I would have gone all five innings and pitched 75, but I’m glad I’m going through this. I had a good start last time, and today is a little bump in the road. I had tough two first innings, but I got a chance to figure it out. I need these things to get ready for when I do come back. I feel like being able to make an adjustment like that and being able to make good pitches will only help me out. I think that’s good thing to be able to get in a groove and work through some things on the mound. This will only help to make the adjustments a lot quicker when I do come back.”

How do you feel health wise?

GF: I feel good. Elbow is good. Stamina is too.

-JD-

Brian Snitker Interviewed on 92.9 The Game

Snitker PC

Brian Snitker answers questions at his January 23 press conference at Coolray Field (Photo by Chris Roughgarden)

In case you missed it, new Gwinnett Braves Manager Brian Snitker was a guest on Mike Sammond’s radio show on 92.9 The Game last Saturday.  In the roughly 10-minute interview, Snitker talked about his move back to the minors, the challenges of managing and coaching third base simultaneously, his experience as the Major League third base coach for Bobby Cox and Fredi Gonzalez, the development of Braves’ top catching prospect Christian Bethancourt, his thoughts on Atlanta’s club in 2014 and more.

Click below to listen:  

-DL

Tom Glavine: The First G-Brave in Cooperstown

Newly-minted Baseball Hall-of-Famer Tom Glavine pitched twice for Gwinnett in 2009.

Newly-minted Baseball Hall-of-Famer Tom Glavine pitched twice for Gwinnett in 2009 (Gwinnett Braves).

Though he played just two games with the club, legendary Atlanta Braves’ left-hander Tom Glavine is a former G-Brave.  With the announcement of Glavine as part of the Baseball Hall of Fame’s 2014 induction class yesterday, the Gwinnett Braves Baseball Club has its first member of Cooperstown.

Glavine, who will be enshrined in the Hall alongside rotation-mate Greg Maddux and their manager Bobby Cox on July 27, 2014, was ever-so-briefly a member of the Gwinnett roster in 2009.  The G-Braves were not quite two months into their inaugural season at then-named Gwinnett Stadium when Glavine came to town on a minor league injury rehab assignment.

Glavine had rejoined Atlanta as a free agent in 2008 after spending the previous five seasons with the New York Mets.  He went 2-4 with a 5.54 ERA in 13 starts that year, a campaign shortened by three trips to the disabled list.  A nagging left elbow strain ended the left-hander’s season in mid-August, and Glavine underwent surgery with Dr. James Andrews to repair a torn flexor tendon on August 21.  The 2009 season was to be the 43-year-old’s comeback from the only major injury of his career.

His first rehab outing came with Double-A Mississippi on April 12, 2009, a 2.0-inning start in which he allowed a run on three hits in a no-decision.  Though he was efficient with 26 strikes among his 36 pitches, Glavine wouldn’t take the mound again until late May.

It was on May 23, 2009 when Glavine made his Gwinnett Braves debut.  In front of a Gwinnett Stadium crowd of 9,294, he turned in 3.0 innings against Toledo, yielding three runs on five hits.  Two of those runs came on a two-run homer by Mud Hens’ first baseman Ryan Roberson in the third inning.  Glavine left in line to lose, but the G-Braves scored seven runs over the fourth and fifth innings to take a 9-3 lead.  Two scoreless frames from reliever Francisley Bueno and a rain storm that erupted prior to the sixth gave Gwinnett the 9-3 victory in a shortened five-inning contest.

Five days later, Glavine made his final appearance in a G-Braves uniform and provided one last glimpse of his legacy for the 5,571 in attendance.  He handcuffed the Indianapolis Indians to six hits over 5.0 scoreless innings, walking one while striking out two.  Glavine threw 67 pitches, 41 for strikes to earn the win as Gwinnett prevailed, 10-6.

Those two outings (1-0 with a 3.38 ERA) marked the whole of Glavine’s time as a G-Brave.  However, it was not his final outing in professional baseball.  The last start of his career came with the Class-A Rome Braves on June 2, 2009.  Glavine won that game as well, tossing 6.0 scoreless, three-hit innings, walking none and striking out two in a 3-0 blanking of Augusta.

Glavine’s rehab assignment ended after that game, as did his professional career.  Though he had been dominant in his last two minor league starts, the 22-year Major League veteran was released on June 3, 2009.  The following February, he officially retired from the game in order to join the Atlanta Braves’ broadcast team and serve as a special assistant to Braves’ president John Schuerholz.

Four years later, Glavine is rightfully headed to the Hall of Fame.  He goes in as a career 305-game winner, a two-time Cy Young Award winner, a 10-time All-Star, a World Series MVP and lastly, a former G-Brave.

Though Glavine is the first player to don the Gwinnett Braves uniform to reach the Baseball Hall of Fame, he’s not the only member of the 2014 class with ties to the Richmond/Gwinnett franchise.  Glavine, along with managers Bobby Cox and Tony LaRussa, all spent time as players with the Richmond Braves.

Bobby Cox, Richmond Braves third baseman in 1967.

Bobby Cox, Richmond Braves third baseman in 1967 (left photo).

Long before his days in the Atlanta dugout, Cox was a Braves’ farmhand himself, playing in 99 games with Richmond in 1967.  A 26-year-old third baseman, Cox batted .297 with 17 doubles, four triples, 14 home runs and 51 RBIs for manager Luman Harris and the ’67 squad.  That team finished first in the International League with an 81-60 regular-season record before falling in the first round of the playoffs.

Tony La Russa played for Atlanta in 1971 and was a member of the Richmond Braves in 1972.

Tony LaRussa played for Atlanta in 1971 and was a member of the Richmond Braves in 1972.

LaRussa played second base for Richmond in 1972 and appeared in 122 games for the club led by manager Clyde King.  Like Cox, he was productive at the plate, hitting .308 with 13 doubles, two triples, 10 home runs and 42 RBIs.  The ’72 R-Braves finished sixth in the IL with a record of 65-78, missing the playoffs.

Glavine as a member of the Richmond Braves, likely during the 1987 season.  (Gwinnett Braves Archives)

Glavine as a member of the Richmond Braves, likely during the 1987 season. (Gwinnett Braves Archives)

And finally we’re back to Glavine, who also pitched for Richmond in 1986 and 1987.  After going 11-6 with a 3.41 ERA in 22 starts for Double-A Greenville in 1986, Glavine joined Richmond and went 1-5 with a 5.62 ERA in seven starts.  Though his numbers weren’t great, he contributed to a team that claimed the franchise’s second Governors’ Cup Championship.  A 21-year-old Glavine returned to manager Roy Majtyka’s club in 1987, and despite a tough-luck 6-12 record, posted a respectable 3.35 ERA and four complete games in 22 starts.  That would be his last non-rehab stint in the minor leagues, as he joined the Atlanta Braves that same season and became a Major League mainstay in 1988.

While Cox, LaRussa and Glavine are going into the Hall based on the merits of historic Major League careers, each began their journey to Cooperstown in the minor leagues.  For a moment in time, those journeys intersected with the rich history of the Richmond and Gwinnett Braves franchise.

-DL

New on the 40: Ryan Buchter

Yesterday, I delved a bit into the background of right-hander Wirfin Obispo, the hard-throwing Gwinnett Braves closer who was just added to the Atlanta Braves’ 40-man roster last Friday.  Today, it’s time to do the same for the other newest 40-man addition, left-hander Ryan Buchter.

The 26-year-old Buchter emerged as a bullpen force for the G-Braves last season, compiling a 4-0 record and a 2.76 ERA in 51 relief appearances.  In addition to converting all five of his save chances, the southpaw also ranked among International League relief leaders in strikeouts per 9.0 IP ratio (1st, 14.95) and lowest opponent batting average (3rd, .168).  Buchter’s most impressive work came down the stretch as he posted a 0.00 ERA over his final 14 appearances in August and September.

Much like Obispo, Buchter’s “breakout” season in 2013 came after a well-traveled start to his career.  Originally drafted by the Washington Nationals in the 33rd round of the 2005 draft, the New Jersey native has already been traded twice.  The Nationals dealt him to the Chicago Cubs in exchange for right-hander Matt Avery in 2008, and the Cubs moved him to Atlanta in a deal for right-hander Rodrigo Lopez in 2011.  Amid the ever-changing scenery, including stops in eight different leagues, Buchter put together All-Star seasons in the Class-A Midwest League in 2009 and the Double-A Southern League in 2010.

Buchter’s travels and subsequent learning experiences were featured in a story I wrote for the final regular-season issue of Tomahawk Talk last year.  In it, he reflected on his unlikely discovery by the Nationals, the benefits of being traded, his confidence gained from the 2012 Arizona Fall League, his “rollercoaster” 2013 season in Gwinnett and more.

Ryan Buchter, photo by Karl Moore / Gwinnett Braves.

Ryan Buchter, photo by Karl Moore / Gwinnett Braves.

Buchter Breaks Out

Left-hander Ryan Buchter has emerged as a go-to arm out of the Gwinnett Braves bullpen in 2013

by Dave Lezotte (published in Tomahawk Talk, August 26, 2013)

He may not qualify as the biggest prospect arm on the Gwinnett Braves’ roster, but what left-hander Ryan Buchter has been able to do in his first full Triple-A season is nothing short of impressive.  The New Jersey native has held International League hitters to a .178 batting average, striking out 83 over 51 innings in 42 outings this year.

Buchter’s professional career, including stops with the Washington Nationals and Chicago Cubs organizations, has always been a bit under-the-radar.  Even his signing by Washington came about almost on accident.

“It was a mistake,” said Buchter about his discovery by the Nationals.  “I ended up pitching against somebody who was being scouted already.  I kind of outpitched him, and it all started from there.”

The pitcher being scouted by both the Nationals and the Cubs was Winslow Township High School right-hander Chris Rollins.  The Nationals passed on Rollins in the 2005 First Year Player Draft, but took Buchter in the 33rd round out of Highland Regional High School in Blackwood, NJ.

A draft-and-follow selection, Buchter attended Gloucester County Community College in nearby Sewell, NJ before starting his professional career in 2006 at age 19.  His first two seasons as a Nationals’ farmhand were anything but successful.  In his first year in the Gulf Coast League, he went 1-1 with a 7.24 ERA in 11 games, one start.  The next year, he went 1-2 with a 6.82 ERA at Short-A Vermont.  He finally showed some promise in 2008, going 4-2 with a 2.59 ERA in 17 games between the GCL and Class-A Hagerstown, but was traded away after the season.

The Nationals dealt Buchter to the Cubs in exchange for right-hander Matt Avery on November 3, 2008.  The change of scenery proved to be a turning point in his career.

“Getting traded kind of jump-started me,” said Buchter about the move to the Cubs.  “It made me take a different path in my career.  I started to work a little harder that off-season and it started to show right away.  From there, I kept building and building.  I attribute (my success) to being traded and not wanting to let the new team down.”

With his career refreshed in a new organization, Buchter put together two award-winning seasons in the Cubs’ system.  In 2009, he made his first professional All-Star Game, going 3-0 with a 1.33 ERA and five saves in 38 games for the Peoria Chiefs of the Class-A Midwest League.  A year later, he was an All-Star again in the Double-A Southern League, going 7-2 with a 4.65 ERA in 47 games for the Tennessee Smokies.  His third campaign as a Cub began with mixed results as he split time between Tennessee and Advanced-A Daytona, but another shakeup was imminent.

On May 26, 2011, Buchter was traded for the second time.  The Cubs sent him to Atlanta in exchange for 35-year-old right-hander Rodrigo Lopez.

“I was just sent down to High-A to iron out some kinks,” reflected Buchter on the time of the trade.  “I started throwing well in Daytona with the intention of (moving back up) to Double-A or Triple-A.  When I got traded, (Daytona manager Buddy Bailey) pulled me aside and said ‘I have good news and bad news for you.  The good news is, you’ve been traded.  The bad news is, you’re going back to High-A.’  That was a difficult thing to handle.”

Buchter started his Atlanta Braves’ career with Advanced-A Lynchburg, going 2-5 with a 3.59 ERA and a career-high 15 savs in 2011.  In 2012, he moved on to Double-A Mississippi, returning to the Southern League for the first time since pitching with Tennessee.  Facing familiar competition, he boasted a 3-1 record, 1.31 ERA and four saves in 35 relief outings for the M-Braves.

“I just went out and did what I knew I could do,” said Buchter about his success.  “Just give me an opportunity and I’ll pitch and throw well, especially late in the game.  I embraced the role I was being used in, seventh, eighth, sometimes ninth (inning) and it worked out.”

His stint with Mississippi worked out for a late-season promotion to Gwinnett for his Triple-A debut.  Buchter went 0-2 with a 10.12 ERA in nine outings for the G-Braves, indicating that he still needed some refinement.  A trip to the prospect-laden Arizona Fall League and an extended look in Braves’ Major League camp during the spring helped him regain confidence.

“It helped me iron out some bad habits that I created when I came up here (to Gwinnett),” said Buchter about his fall and spring assignments.  “It made me realize that I can get anybody out.  I can get the prospects out; I can get the big league guys out.  Once you realize that, I don’t want to say the game becomes easier, but you start to have a little more faith in yourself.”

Buchter began his 2013 season on Gwinnett’s Opening Day roster and was nearly unhittable early, postin a 1.00 ERA in nine April outings.  He came back down to earth in the summer months, going 0-0 with a 4.58 ERA in 28 games from May through July, but found his best stuff in August.  Through his first seven games, he went 2-0 with a 0.00 ERA and one save.

“It’s been a pretty fun rollercoaster,” said Buchter about 2013.  “With pitching, it’s easy to be a perfectionist and want to go out and pick yourself apart for giving up a walk or giving up a hit.  Sometimes the hardest thing is to realize that if you throw up a zero (no runs), it’s actually a good inning no matter what else happens.”

He’s had plenty of those good innings lately for Gwinnett, most of them in pivotal spots.  With the departure of closer Cory Rasmus to the Los Angeles Angels in a July trade, Buchter has been given more opportunities to pitch with late leads and in save situations.  Pitching in tight ballgames is something he relishes.

“The game’s a little more fun when you’re out there and you’re up by one, down by one and you know your team needs you to throw up a zero,” said Buchter.  “It’s something that I’ve learned to embrace and I look forward to a one-run game.  I get a little antsy in the bullpen hoping they’ll call down and say my name, that way I get a chance to come in.”

Buchter has climbed to the top of the league in relief strikeouts thanks to a fastball that sits in the mid-90′s and a willingness to challenge hitters with it.  For the left-hander, getting ahead in the count quickly is the key to his prolific strikeout numbers.

“If I get ahead, a lot of times my success rate is a lot higher than a lot of guys,” said Buchter.  “Get strike one, and then I try to pitch to one side of the plate for righties and lefties.  If I get two strikes on a guy, then I’ll try to put him away.  It’s a very simple game plan.  A lot of fastballs; then I’ll mix the cutter in and then try to put them away with the breaking ball.”

Buchter’s professional career started with an unlikely discovery, progressed with three different organizations and has resulted in a 2013 season that has him closer than ever to the Major Leagues.  While he waits for a shot at Atlanta’s bullpen, he remains optimistic and focused.

“Obviously, you’re waiting for your turn, and for a lot of bullpen guys, it’s luck,” said Buchter.  “It’s luck and what the team has planned for you.  They may have a plan for you, they might not, but you’ve got to continue to stay focused on the task at hand down here (in Gwinnett).  It’s good to just keep your mind on things down here and do your job every day.  If you don’t do your job here, they’re not going to be looking for you anyway.”

The Atlanta Braves will certainly be giving Buchter a long look when Spring Training starts up in February.  For the first time in his career, he has the stability that comes from being on a Major League 40-man roster.

-DL

Brandon Beachy Quotes After First Rehab Start

What did you think?

BB: “I feel good, you know. It was fun. It was nice to be out there in a real game with fans in the seats and be able to compete.”

How did you feel? Were you unsettled at first at all? Did you settle in at all?

BB: “A little uncomfortable I would say. Just a little out of rhythm, out of sync, I would find it. What usually takes a batter or a pitch or two, it’s taking three batters or four pitches to make the adjustments. But, that’s going to come, the feel is going to come as I get more comfortable out there. The speed of the game is a lot quicker than the bullpen I have been throwing, so I have to slow myself down a little bit and that will help out my rhythm. I have to stay back on my back side a little bit and that will help out a lot.”

It (feel for the game) pretty much goes hand-in-hand with the command issues?

BB: “Yeah, that exactly what it was.”

How would you access the performance (4 IP, 2H, 2ER, 3BB, 3K, 70 pitches-35 strikes)?

BB: “I feel good about it. I physically felt strong. I felt good. Like I said, I threw a lot of quality pitches, and at times it would get away, were normally it’s a quicker adjustment, it took me a lot longer to get going. It’s something I have to fight through and really focus on slowing myself down, controlling my breathing and that will help me make the adjustments quicker.”

What was your reaction, feelings about sitting down and coming back out in-between innings?

BB: “I felt really good, that’s something that has been in the back of my mind. How I would respond to the time between innings, but it didn’t tighten up on me or anything like that. It felt really good physically. I couldn’t be any happier with how it felt.”

Command issues aside, how did you feel about velocity, movement?

BB: “I don’t know about velocity, they weren’t really teeing off on my fastball when I was throwing it for a strike, so judging by the swings that is not an issue. Some of the pitches were good, threw a couple good changeups, a couple good sliders, and I threw a handful of bad ones too. It’s all a part of that rhythm, repetition and just being comfortable.”

Is this what you expected for your first time out?

BB: “I really don’t know what to expect. Going up against Triple-A hitters for four innings and not having faced guys in weeks. I guess, I’m happy with it, not knowing what was going to happen. Of course, I want to go out there and not give up a hit, not give up a run, but that’s just part of the process.”

What adjustment will you make between now and your next outing?

BB: “I’ll watch it on tape. I’ll check out the film and I can already tell you what I will see on a lot of them. It’s just rushing down the mound, not sitting back on my back side and getting my weight shifted quite long enough, and that’s causing me to hang some off-speed pitches and throwing some fastballs right into the dirt, and be non-competitive at times with pitches and getting counts where I’m digging myself in holes. However, that’s all fixable and it’s something I should have expected.”

How important was it to limit damage in the 2nd and 4th innings?

 BB: “Yeah, I guess. Being in a situation with guys on base that’s something you can’t simulate in the bullpen. I think I did a pretty good job of calming down. I walked a few guys, but it was in situations where I had a bases open and I knew that. I was trying to work on stuff, I threw pitches that I wouldn’t normally throw in that situation just to get them in, and I felt I need to work on and I needed to throw. But, a lot of times they did not work out for me and I didn’t execute them. Those are things I will need to have eventually, so I might as well start working on them now.”

Will you stay on the same schedule (make another start in five days)? Will your pitch count increase?

BB: “Yes, I anticipated it moving up.”

-JD-

2013 Spring Training – Weekly Update

Ernesto Mejia is 1-for-6 in four games in Grapefruit League.

Ernesto Mejia is 1-for-6 in four games in Grapefruit League.

Spring Training is underway and the Atlanta Braves have got off to a slow start, losing three of their first four games. With new faces around camp and early departures for the World Baseball Classic, the Braves are not worried about win-loss records, but concerned with building a continuity to prepare for an exciting summer of baseball.

With several regulars leaving for the WBC, it has allowed for former 2012 G-Braves to make an impact in Lake Buena Vista, FL. Twelve of 15 Braves that wore the G-Braves uniform in 2012 have seen the field this spring.

Joe Terdoslavich made a big splash, hitting a solo-homer on Feb.22 against the Detroit Tigers. His home run was the lone run for the Braves, as they were stymied by seven different pitchers in a 2-1 loss.

Tyler Pastornicky has flourished since Andrelton Simmons left to Taiwan to prepare for the WBC. In his last two games, Pastornicky has picked up two hits and an RBI.

The other three positions players, Ernesto Mejia, Jordan Parraz and Jose Yepez have one hit each through the first four games. Jose Constanza, who is having visa issues in the Dominican Republic, is yet to report to camp.

On the hill, the race for five went from luke-warm to steamy. Sean Gilmartin and Julio Teheran matched each other on Sunday afternoon with two scoreless frames. Both hurlers picked up two strikeouts and allowed one base runner each. Gilmartin gave up a single, while Teheran walked one.

If the race for five was not enough, the bullpen battles are starting to get hot. Cory Gearrin has tossed two scoreless frames, allowing one hit and recording two strikeouts, while Dusty Hughes hurled a perfect frame with one strikeout.

Lefties Ryan Buchter, Yohan Flande and Daniel Rodriguez have struggled through the first few days of camp. Buchter has allowed two runs on three hits in one inning. Flande has given up six runs on seven hits in two innings of baseball. Rodriguez’ control issues continue to give him trouble, walking three and giving up three runs in his lone appearance.

The players return to action today at 1:05 p.m. at Champion Stadium in Lake Buena Vista, FL against the Washington Nationals.

-JD

2013 Spring Training – Familiar Faces, New Places

Stephen Gartrell (left) slugs home run, while J.C. Boscan (right) walks off the field.

Stefan Gartrell (left) slugs home run, while J.C. Boscan (right) takes the field.

With the off-season almost in the books, a new crop of G-Braves is forming at Atlanta Braves Spring Training in Lake Buena Vista, FL.  We’ve already taken a look at some of the potential returnees from last year’s club as well as some of the new faces that could impact Atlanta or Gwinnett’s roster.  For this post, we’ll check in with 2012 G-Braves who are no longer with the Braves organization.

Catcher J.C. Boscan signed a free agent contract with the Chicago Cubs this off-season. The longest tenured G-Brave spent four seasons with Gwinnett. In 210 games, the right-handed hitting backstop hit .210 with eight home runs and 54 RBI. He is fifth in Gwinnett Braves history in games and fourth in at bats (689) dating back to 2009.

While Boscan spent four years with Gwinnett, shortstop Josh Wilson’s tenure was short-lived, as the slick-fielding infielder wore the G-Braves uniform for one season. Wilson signed a free agent contract with the Arizona Diamondbacks in the off-season. He spent all of 2012 with the G-Braves after spending a part of the last four seasons in the big leagues. In 122 games with Gwinnett, Wilson hit .241 with five home runs and 43 RBI.

The outfield lost three notable players in Luis Durango, Stefan Gartrell and Felix Pie.

Durango signed a free agent contract with the Kansas City Royals. He played all of 2012 with Gwinnett, finishing the season fourth on the team in RBI (45), third in batting average (.289), second in triples (5) and first in stolen bases (46). Durango’s 46 stolen bases led the International League and are second all-time in Gwinnett Braves history.

Pie was another welcomed addition to the club last season, hitting .285 with six home runs and 51 RBI. He led the squad in triples (7) and was a perfect 16-for-16 in stolen bases. Pie signed with the Pittsburgh Pirates.

Gartrell’s tenure with the G-Braves may be the most celebrated from a hitter’s standpoint. In two seasons, the outfielder has made his stamp in the Gwinnett record books. He is second all-time in doubles (50), RBI (146) and runs (134), while coming in third in hits (217), games (238) and at bats (849). His 45 home runs top the charts. Gartrell signed with the Chicago White Sox in the off-season and receive an invitation to Spring Training as a non-roster invitee.  The White Sox originally drafted Gartrell in the 31st round of the 2006 draft, but shipped him to Atlanta in a 2011 trade.

On the mound, the G-Braves saw a few hurlers leave for free agency, while two others were involved in big trades this off-season.
Buddy Carlyle moved on to Canada, signing a free agent deal with the Toronto Blue Jays. The right-handed pitcher made his mark with the G-Braves in 2009, posting a 3-1 record with a 1.76 ERA. Last season, he went 5-4 with a 3.43 ERA and 73 strikeouts in 76 innings.

Jair Jurrjens moved on and signed a contract with the Baltimore Orioles. Jurrjens made 17 career starts for the G-Braves from 2010-2012. In 17 games, he went 6-7 with a 4.93 ERA while striking 51 batters in 91.1 innings.

Jair Jurrjens went 4-6 with 4.98 ERA in 14 starts for the G-Braves in 2012.

Jair Jurrjens went 4-6 with 4.98 ERA in 14 starts for the G-Braves in 2012.

Tommy Hanson made one rehab start for the G-Braves last season and was the opening day starter for the G-Braves’ inaugural season in 2009. The right-hander was shipped off to the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim in exchange for reliever Jordan Walden. Hanson was always outstanding with Gwinnett, recording a 4-3 record with a 1.39 ERA and 95 strikeouts in 71.1 innings of work.

Finally, Randall Delgado was a part of one of the blockbuster trades this off-season, as the Braves traded him and four others to the Diamondbacks in exchange for outfielder Justin Upton and infielder Chris Johnson. Delgado, rated one of the top prospects in the Braves organization, spent two stints with the G-Braves in 2011 and 2012. In 12 starts, he went 6-5 with a 4.09 ERA and 76 strikeouts in 66 innings.

The lists of other G-Braves that have found a new home are as followed:

Lyle Overbay- Boston Red Sox (Free Agent)
Rusty Ryal- Los Angeles Dodgers (Free Agent)
Miguel Batista- Colorado Rockies (Free Agent)
Erik Cordier- Pittsburgh Pirates (Free Agent)
Peter Moylan- Los Angeles Dodgers (Free Agent)
Adam Russell- Baltimore Orioles (Free Agent)

First-year Gwinnett Braves manager Randy Ready will lead the 2013 edition of the Gwinnett Braves for the first time on Thursday, April 4 as the club opens the season at Coolray Field with a 7:05 PM game against Charlotte.  For tickets, merchandise and more information, visit GwinnettBraves.com.

-JD

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 44 other followers